Extended Rear facing

jdchic3

New member
So, I understand the concept, and have seen crash footage, that if you are in a frontal or side-frontal collision that it's safer for your children to be RF, especially at a younger age. The question I have though is, if you were rear-ended, wouldn't it have the same effect as if your child were FF and you were in a head-on collision? That also brings up then, aren't you more likely to be rear-ended than in a frontal collision? Someone please help me clarify!
 
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oxeye

New member
Severe rear-end collisions are far less common than severe frontal or side collisions, so you want the child to be the best protected for what is most likely to happen and most likely to injure you child.

I'm sure others can elaborate, though. :)
 

Victorious4

Senior Community Member
Frontal collisions are by far the most common. Side impacts are even more common than rear (also more dangerous). RF is safer in both types.

Also, data does not show that there is an increased risk of being RF in a rear end collision.
 

sb518

New member
I'm not a tech but I imagine with ERF'ing they are more reclined which would make the impact easier on them instead of sitting straight up.
 

AdventureMom

Senior Community Member
Instead of rephrasing, I'm going to just copy/paste... :)

What if I am hit from behind? Won't my child be safer facing forward?​

Frontal and side impacts are the most common type of crashes. They account for 96% of all crashes. They are also the most deadly type of crashes (especially side impacts) and rear-facing children have MUCH more protection in both types of crashes than forward-facing. In the 4% of rear impact crashes that a rear-facing child would be in, they have at least the same amount of protection that a FF child would have in a frontal impact, with the added benefit of less crash energy being transferred to them, and the fact that the rear impact is usually not as severe.

The forces in a rear impact crash are much different from the forces in a frontal impact crash. In a frontal impact, the forces are much greater because the vehicles are usually traveling in opposite directions. Experts suggest that a frontal crash is the same as hitting a concrete barrier – the vehicle and all occupants come to a dead stop within less than 1 second.

When you are struck in a rear impact, the vehicles involved are traveling in the same direction, and the vehicle that is hit in the back has room to move forward. The crash force on the occupants is much less than in a frontal impact. The movement of the impacted vehicle, in addition to the crush zone, absorbs a lot of the crash energy, so it is not transferred to the child. Additionally, the majority of rear impacts are at low speeds.

In short, if your child is rear-facing, he has optimal protection in the types of crashes you are most likely to be in. If he is forward-facing, he may have optimal protection in a rear-end crash, but statistically, that is the least likely to happen and he is 60% more likely to be injured or killed in the types of crashes (frontal, side impact) you are most likely to be in.

You can learn more about the physics of rear-facing at http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html
 

crunchierthanthou

New member
I'm not a tech but I imagine with ERF'ing they are more reclined which would make the impact easier on them instead of sitting straight up.

You'd think so, but the more upright the better. You want the seat to take the force of the impact. RF seats can be reclined between 30 and 45 degrees. The closer they are to 30, the more of the crash forces are transfered into the seat. Older children who can hold their heads up should be as upright as they can comfortably be (as in, not slumping forward when sleeping, etc.).
 

jdchic3

New member
You guys have been so wonderful! Hopefully DD won't mind turning back around. Hopefully she'll be too excited about her new seat getting here to care. (Britax is replacing our broken DC with a MA)
 

EzzieMom

New member
You guys have been so wonderful! Hopefully DD won't mind turning back around. Hopefully she'll be too excited about her new seat getting here to care. (Britax is replacing our broken DC with a MA)


I turned my DD#2 back around to RFing after I read all the info. and someone (form the Kyle David Miller Foundation) told me it was the safest best place for her. She thinks it's funny and actually likes it...she says "Mommy? I like being upside down!" LOL!!! Cracks me up everytime!
 

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