At what point would you consider importing a seat?

luckyclov

New member
Our vehicles are not the same as vehicles overseas. And, in relation, installations of child restraints are not the same. Our vehicle manuals may not allow us to do X,Y,Z, while the imported seat in reference may require us to do the same X,Y, and Z for proper installation. Manufacturer's crash testing on imported seats are not performed in American vehicles. The same shred of uncertainty/worry that won't allow me to tether my ProSport after 52 lbs will also not allow me to install an imported seat in my American vehicle. I don't have any idea what'll happen.

Like I said, it's a personal choice. We all have different criteria that contribute to our own personal risk v. benefit assessment.
 
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LISmama810

Admin - CPS Technician
clov878 said:
Manufacturer's crash testing on imported seats are not performed in American vehicles.

Well, to be fair, domestic seats aren't crash-tested in American vehicles, either.

As long as I didn't have to brace a seat in a car that didn't allow bracing, I wouldn't be too concerned about the installation issue.

But that said, I also wouldn't import a seat unless I had a 45-lb under-2-year-old. That's both for legal and pragmatic reasons.

Ten--or even five--years ago my answer might have been different. There are so many options now, though, that it would be a rare, rare child who can't make it to 2 (or beyond) in a US seat.
 

luckyclov

New member
Well, to be fair, domestic seats aren't crash-tested in American vehicles, either.
Maybe it should have been worded differently. Manufacturer's child seat crash testing is based on the relative country's (works both ways, I would assume; Euro seats/American vehicles, American seats/Euro vehicles) vehicle standards/"stuff". Many (many, not all) vehicle manufacturers do not allow front seat bracing , which is why some (some, not all) child seat manufacturers discourage it. By doing so, we compromise function of sensors and airbags. Those same sensors don't exist in Euro vehicles; therefore bracing of the front seat(s) is not only allowed but required for proper installation of certain child seats.

As long as I didn't have to brace a seat in a car that didn't allow bracing, I wouldn't be too concerned about the installation issue.

But that said, I also wouldn't import a seat unless I had a 45-lb under-2-year-old. That's both for legal and pragmatic reasons.

Ten--or even five--years ago my answer might have been different. There are so many options now, though, that it would be a rare, rare child who can't make it to 2 (or beyond) in a US seat.
I agree, 100%.
 

LISmama810

Admin - CPS Technician
clov878 said:
Maybe it should have been worded differently. Manufacturer's child seat crash testing is based on the relative country's (works both ways, I would assume; Euro seats/American vehicles, American seats/Euro vehicles) vehicle standards/"stuff". Many vehicle manufacturers do not allow front seat touching/bracing, which is why some child seat manufacturers discourage it. By doing so, we compromise function of sensors and airbags. Those same sensors don't exist in Euro vehicles; therefore bracing/touching of the front seat(s) is not only allowed but required for proper installation of certain child seats.

I get what you're saying, but the seats we have and our crash testing really aren't based on our vehicle standards at all. The reason many seats don't allow bracing isn't because of airbag sensors--those are relatively new technology.

If our crash testing was based even remotely on real vehicles, we'd have a test bench that in some way resembled a real back seat. And we don't.
 
This is a question we will likely face when we have a biological child. DH is 6'6" and I am 6'0. Both of us were very tall, chubby toddlers who turned into very lean children.
My plan is to look at the growth curve of my child, and import at 1 y.o. if it looks like they will outgrow the radian (or whatever the tallest RF seat is at that point) before 3.
I don't think I'd import after 3, though. But you never know. Maybe if we won the lottery, since my goal is to RF until 4. However, I feel like spending what, $600 to RF from 3-4 is not necessarily worth it. But I don't know how I'll truly feel until I am in that position.
 

christineka

New member
I would if: My kid under age 3.5 had maxed out all US rfing seats.

That wouldn't happen, though because I have small kids, so in reality, I'd import if I had money burning a hole in my pocket. I'd like a cool, Swedish seat just because.
 

luckyclov

New member
I get what you're saying, but the seats we have and our crash testing really aren't based on our vehicle standards at all. The reason many seats don't allow bracing isn't because of airbag sensors--those are relatively new technology.

If our crash testing was based even remotely on real vehicles, we'd have a test bench that in some way resembled a real back seat. And we don't.
I give up.:p Every time I try to clarify one point, there's another that I forget re-word. I meant to remove "crash testing". You are right, crash testing isn't real-world because the majority of us aren't driving around in bench seats with perfect 35 MPH crash force/objects.

The *child seat* manufacturers that do not allow bracing do so for many reasons: the effect of bracing on movement/rotation/absorbtion/shell structure/the lack of testing or failue of/whatever/I don't know. I can't remember if it ws Evenflo or Dorel, but one of the two did list airbag/sensoring as a reason when I spoke to CS last year (and, you know, "You should always read your vehicle manual before you install your seat."). The *vehicle* manufacturers that do not allow bracing do so for airbag/sensor reason(s).
 

Brigala

Well-known member
I actually don't have a serious issue with breaking the law in this regard. I have an issue with spending a lot of money on something unless I think the benefits outweigh the drawbacks of doing so. There are probably a lot of things I could do to protect my child with the $900 or so I could spend on a Swedish seat: Remodel her room so all electrical outlets are near the ceiling, for example. Or maybe spend it on gas and drive her around more often in the Suburban instead of in the tin can we call a Civic. So my kid would have to be fairly young for me to consider importing a Swedish seat. I would say if she couldn't fit RF in a Radian at 18 months, I probably would import. If she couldn't fit RF at 36 months, I probably wouldn't. Somewhere in between the two, I'd probably sit down and think about it long and hard, and the closer to 18 months she was, the more likely it is I'd go ahead and spend the money.
 

twinsmom

New member
This, unless there is research before that point that shows that there is a significant safety difference RF to 3 until 2.

There was a European study recently that recommended RF to age 4. I don't have the link now, but I know it was mentioned here....
 

StillThankful

New member
Being able to rearface my daughters to 55# in the Multi Tech makes me want to import a seat right now:).

My tipping point would be if I couldn't rearface my 2 year old.

When I first joined this board, I believe the max rearfacing seat went to 33#, then Britax went to #35, and I started to see a myriad of 35# rfing seats come out. Then the My Ride came out with the 40# rf seat, which almost made me faint in excitement! Then of course, the beloved Radian came out with the 45# rfing seat.

Before those seats mentioned above came out, I was forced to ff DD1 soon after she turned 2. I happily dropped app $340 for a new Radian and My Ride to Re-rearface her.

I am sooooo thankful to have had the opportunity to rf DD1 to 3y11m. She could technically still rf in it by height and weight BUT the recline began to look to me at or right past 45 degrees as she grew taller--and I was very uncomfortable with it.

That being said, If there was a seat right now that came out to 50# rf that costs $300 [which didn't overrecline for taller children], I'd get it to be able to RF DD1 again. It's just me. I just read alot of articles on carseat.se and desire so badly to rearface DD1 again especially in the possibility of side impact collisions--concerning preimpact braking.

I'd like to rearface to 17 but that's a different story....:rolleyes:
 

Aurezalia

Well-known member
Honestly, for me, (And my kids that don't exist yet :p) I will import if they are unable to make it to 4 RF'ing in American seats. I mean, even this is probably pretty unlikely, since I don't have kids yet, and our seats are advancing more and more so that by the time it would even be an issue, that gap between American and Swedish seats will most likely have mostly closed. But yes, it is that much of a priority to RF until at least 4 for me.
 

BabyKaykes

New member
Have we met KQs youngest? Yeah....

My personal, absolute, bare minimum for FF is 3yo. So if my just turned 2yo is hairs away from outgrowing the Radian, I'm importing.
 

babyherder

New member
Well, I would right now if I could. I don't have any kids and the youngest I transport is 5. But I just think it would be cool to play with Swedish rf seats. When I have kids I hope to rf until 5 but that could change when I actually do have kids.
 

carseatcoach

Carseat Crankypants
I will state for the record that I am not the carseat police and do not care all that much what others choose to do with their kids in their cars.

But the "I want it because I want to play with it", or "because it's cool" is very offputting to me. We are trying to educate parents that carseats are vital pieces of safety equipment and they need to choose carseats that fit their child and their car. Breaking the law for cool new toys seems not to fit in with that mission.

Maybe it's just me.
 

StillThankful

New member
Akta DuoLogic. Which would be at the top of my list. It is AWESOME!!! YouTube it.

Thanks! I'm getting ready to YouTube it right now.:D http://youtu.be/KrmKpEN1148

Update--YOUTUBED IT & LOVE IT!!! Gosh, I wish we could have these seats here....the seem so much more solidly built. They have the foot prop for downward rotation AND the rebound bar AND the installation seems like a breeze. Yes...I'm whining....I want one now:(http://youtu.be/YSrf7VExLd8
 
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