Another Booster question! Booster Training

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Maedze

New member
Sure you *can* (as long as it's not forbidden in the vehicle manual) but it's not necessary. It can be a helpful tool for those early days. DS1 (5.5) actually prefers to have the belt locked when he's boosterd. He feels more secure.

Start with short trips, with no other distractions (other kids, radio, etc.). Remind her of the rules. If she messes with the belt or moves out of position stop immediately to correct her. The average 6 year old should pick it up really quickly :)
 

thepeach80

Senior Community Member
I find w/ older kids, at least mine, little 'training' is needed. They're old enough you can say 'this is how you need to act' and they get it for the most part. Doesn't mean they'll always be perfect (AJ had a tempter tantrum in his just yesterday and wouldn't sit back, lol) but it's not as hard as starting at 4.5yo or so. Evan has been in a booster twice and doesn't like it b/c I think he knows he has a hard time sitting still and he knows he has to in a booster. :) Our seatbelts don't lock, so that's not really an option anyways.
 

Niea

New member
My kids is 4.5 and I really didn't have to do anything. I sat her in it, showed her her how to sit properly, routed the belt around her, and buckled. I explained how she needed to sit and how she coudn't lean forward or to the side. Basically, I told her to sit back with her head between the wings for the entire trip. Then we took a drive to the supermarket, which is like 1/2 a mile away. She did great. And, uh, since I had just been in a wreck and didn't have a replacement harnessed seat for her, the booster was it. She rode around in it for a few weeks with ZERO problems. I know she's on the younger side, but she's got great maturity and didn't need ANY reminding to sit properly for the few weeks until I got her another harnessed seat.

My theory is that booster-training is like potty-training. If it just seems harder than it should be, you're probably right. It's best to step back and try again later on. When the kid is ready, it goes quickly and easily.
 

DahliaRW

New member
My kids is 4.5 and I really didn't have to do anything. I sat her in it, showed her her how to sit properly, routed the belt around her, and buckled. I explained how she needed to sit and how she coudn't lean forward or to the side. Basically, I told her to sit back with her head between the wings for the entire trip. Then we took a drive to the supermarket, which is like 1/2 a mile away. She did great. And, uh, since I had just been in a wreck and didn't have a replacement harnessed seat for her, the booster was it. She rode around in it for a few weeks with ZERO problems. I know she's on the younger side, but she's got great maturity and didn't need ANY reminding to sit properly for the few weeks until I got her another harnessed seat.

My theory is that booster-training is like potty-training. If it just seems harder than it should be, you're probably right. It's best to step back and try again later on. When the kid is ready, it goes quickly and easily.
ITA. My ds1 was so motivated to NOT be in a harness he sat perfectly in a booster a few months after his 4th birthday. Some kids will do it, some won't.
 

Kat_Momof3

New member
once they are 6, booster training really is just telling them the rules and maybe telling them why they have to sit straight the whole ride and keep their seatbelt in position...

most kids by that age just aren't going to try to lean forward to get toys and stuff... they're used to the carseat and the habit of sitting right the whole ride.
 

Qarin

New member
The one thing I've noticed with long-term harnessed kids is that when they get in a booster, they're so used to not having to worry about what the car is doing that they're more likely to tip with curves, because they're not actively keeping themselves upright (and hence keeping the booster sat upright, too). This has happened with a couple of friends, and all it took was pointing it out to the child (7-9 year olds, in these cases).
 

emars002

New member
The one thing I've noticed with long-term harnessed kids is that when they get in a booster, they're so used to not having to worry about what the car is doing that they're more likely to tip with curves, because they're not actively keeping themselves upright (and hence keeping the booster sat upright, too). This has happened with a couple of friends, and all it took was pointing it out to the child (7-9 year olds, in these cases).
Great point - Thank you! Originally I really wanted a latchable booster but I do not think any of those fit a small kiddo well - I think i will try her in the van first where her booster will be on cloth seats and between an armrest and DDs boulevard - DH wanted to start her in the truck but he has leather seats and nothing directly next to her on one side so I think she might get tipped a little easier than in the mini van
 

emars002

New member
I mentioned the Clek Oobr in my first post. It's latchable, and it fits small riders well.
Yes I looked that one up - i am working on DH and the price right now - He has been very good spending that on car seats but I am having a harder time convincing him on that for a booster - I'm working on it though:D I'm sure if I can sell her other seat to make up some of the difference, i should be able to talk him into it - We may just start with a turbo until I can get the Oobr.
 

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