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  1. #41
    CPS Technician Ali's Avatar
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    I'm confused as well. I have a 2010 Mazda 3 which I love and DH has the CX-5. We can only do 3 seats in mine because of the narrowness of the center seat in the CX-5. I have been coveting the 5 for quite awhile. We only have 1 DD, but often have extra kids with us.

    My confusion comes with crash testing. At least 1 vehicle or point of impact is staying still and I'm assuming is attached to the ground in some way. Unless it's a single vehicle accident, wouldn't both vehicles be most likely moving or deflect the impact in some way?

    I know there is no way to foresee every crash scenario for testing. That's why we're all here to keep our children and selves as safe as possible!
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  3. #42
    Carseat Crazy nataliem257's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ali View Post
    I'm confused as well. I have a 2010 Mazda 3 which I love and DH has the CX-5. We can only do 3 seats in mine because of the narrowness of the center seat in the CX-5. I have been coveting the 5 for quite awhile. We only have 1 DD, but often have extra kids with us.

    My confusion comes with crash testing. At least 1 vehicle or point of impact is staying still and I'm assuming is attached to the ground in some way. Unless it's a single vehicle accident, wouldn't both vehicles be most likely moving or deflect the impact in some way?

    I know there is no way to foresee every crash scenario for testing. That's why we're all here to keep our children and selves as safe as possible!
    In the small overlap test, yes. It seems to simulate hitting a stationary object like a pole or a tree more than a moving car. The car in the side impact test is sitting still but not bolted to the ground. This would be closer to getting tboned in a parking lot, or pulling out very slowly onto a street, or coming from a stop at an intersection, etc. There are videos on the IIHS website if you want to see what it looks like.

  4. #43
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Quote Originally Posted by littleangelfire View Post
    But it said only 1 car did well, and a car hardly anyone has at that, the cooper. I live in a high COL area and still only rarely see these, and we have a dealership that sells them 5 minutes away!. I see more BMWs, Infiniti, Jaguar and the like. My point being if NO cars are doing well, I'm not going to worry that much about it. Or did I misunderstand something?

    The small overlap test is like any other new or updated test. Many cars don't do well initially. Then more and more start doing well as new versions are released. A number of vehicles have done well, but not many in the class of the Mazda5. The question is what could you replace it with that might be similar in cost and much better in safety? I don't think there are many good options.

    For new ones, the closest competitor with 3-rows to the Mazda5 is perhaps the Kia Sorento and it did Poorly in the small overlap test as well. Among small 3-row vehicles, only the Mitsubishi Outlander has done well in all the IIHS and NHTSA testing. The 2014 is reasonable, but really not as nice as the Mazda5 in other ways, and is more expensive too. The problem is the 2013 and older ones didn't do well in the NHTSA testing.

    So, I'm not sure what you could find anywhere near the price of a 2012-2013 Mazda5 with similar flexibility but improved crash test results. The only thing that comes to mind is a Dodge Grand Caravan America Value Package trim. It doesn't have a small overlap result, but at least has decent results in all the other tests back to at least 2012. Of course, there is nearly zero fun to drive factor there, like you have in the Mazda5.

  5. #44
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Definitely worth checking out the videos. Between the IIHS and NHTSA, they do try to crash test the most common types of crashes. Obviously, if crashes vary, say a small overlap on the RIGHT side instead of the LEFT side, all bets are off, unless you assume everything is perfectly symmetrical. That may be true for side impacts, but maybe not for frontal crashes. Impossible to say for sure.

    In any case, if I was buying a new car, I'd likely pass on anything with "Marginal" or "3-star" results or worse in any of the frontal or side impact crash tests. For used cars, it can be so much harder to find what you want with the features you want that sometimes you have to make compromises on a crash test result. For example, maybe that 3-star result for the front passenger isn't a big deal because you rarely ever have a passenger there?

  6. #45
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Quote Originally Posted by DawgDad View Post
    Don't disagree at all there. The small overlap is a tough one to pass on most cars, but it's becoming a needed issue with distracted drivers crossing the yellow lines into oncoming traffic. Saw one this morning when I went to go run some things to dry cleaning. Looked like it was low speed, but still...didn't look pretty. Probably both totaled with broken axles and frame damage. I was thinking, "well damn, I was just talking about this on the forums an hour ago..."
    I've seen my 15-year old swerve slightly into an oncoming lane when looking over his shoulder to make a lane change... He is going to be very conservative and unlikely to be distracted, except perhaps in knowing where he is going lol. It's my daughter 2 years behind him that is the bigger concern.

    So, I'm definitely considering a compact sedan or SUV in the next couple years if we need a third vehicle and it won't have too many blemishes from top crash scores all around!

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPSDarren View Post
    The question is what could you replace it with that might be similar in cost and much better in safety? I don't think there are many good options.
    This. And not just cost, either. We need 2 cars that can accommodate a giant, impulsive, long torsoed 4.5 year old plus 2 more kids. We live in the frozen north, and have a very narrow 2 car garage. Sliding doors make that reasonable. A second full size minivan does not. Frankly, if these test results had come out 6 months ago (we've had the 5 since March) I probably would have given the planned purchase some serious second thoughts, looked at other options again...and gone ahead with it. It's certainly safer than the car it replaced, and I didn't freak out over carting my kids around (not to mention my DH and myself) in it, right?

    So I'm planning to RF my 2yo forever in that car. There are no car seats on the US market that will RF my 4 yo. I've toyed with the idea of a Swedish seat. (Anyone know if Mazda allows bracing against any of the seats in the 5? It might actually be really convenient to RF him in the 3rd row. Or the shell height on the Britax Two Way Elite?) Or I might get him a Pinnacle.

    Baby due in November will obviously be RF for a long time.

    And I have my fingers crossed for an airbag fix.

  8. #47
    CPS Technician Aurezalia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lgenne View Post
    This. And not just cost, either. We need 2 cars that can accommodate a giant, impulsive, long torsoed 4.5 year old plus 2 more kids. We live in the frozen north, and have a very narrow 2 car garage. Sliding doors make that reasonable. A second full size minivan does not. Frankly, if these test results had come out 6 months ago (we've had the 5 since March) I probably would have given the planned purchase some serious second thoughts, looked at other options again...and gone ahead with it. It's certainly safer than the car it replaced, and I didn't freak out over carting my kids around (not to mention my DH and myself) in it, right? So I'm planning to RF my 2yo forever in that car. There are no car seats on the US market that will RF my 4 yo. I've toyed with the idea of a Swedish seat. (Anyone know if Mazda allows bracing against any of the seats in the 5? It might actually be really convenient to RF him in the 3rd row. Or the shell height on the Britax Two Way Elite?) Or I might get him a Pinnacle. Baby due in November will obviously be RF for a long time. And I have my fingers crossed for an airbag fix.
    I have a lot of answers for you! This is my self reminder to come back when I have time... And permission for you to bug me if I don't.

  9. #48
    CPS Technician Aurezalia's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Quote Originally Posted by lgenne View Post
    So I'm planning to RF my 2yo forever in that car. There are no car seats on the US market that will RF my 4 yo. I've toyed with the idea of a Swedish seat. (Anyone know if Mazda allows bracing against any of the seats in the 5? It might actually be really convenient to RF him in the 3rd row. Or the shell height on the Britax Two Way Elite?) Or I might get him a Pinnacle.
    Okay, I actually have a TWE in my 5 right now for a GIANT 2yo (same size as the tall 4yo.) The Mazda5 allows bracing against the driver's seat as the sensors are under the seat, not in the back. Mazda5 doesn't allow bracing against the passenger seat, but really that only matters if you have a front passenger... which I really never do, so I installed my TWE behind the passenger side as that works better for the setup in my car.


    The TWE has a shell height of about 22-23", and then it allows RF to the ears instead of the 1" rule, so that gives another 5" or so depending on head shape. VERY tall - as tall as the tallest American seats, the Graco clones, but with a 55lb limit instead.


    It works well in the second row, either at the younger child 40* recline, or the upright 10* angle. (And you have room to install it away from the seatback, to allow for leg room for big kids.) In the third row, it has enough room to install at the reclined angle, or upright, but there's not really room to pull it forward to give more legroom. It WILL work back there, though.





    I'm very happy with how the TWE works in this car... and since the test results came out, even more comfortable with my decision to use a European seat to keep an off-the-charts 2yo RF'ing as long as possible. I hope that gives you a better idea of if it's a good option for your family.

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  11. #49
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    That's amazing information. Thank you so much! My husband had me mostly convinced that I shouldn't even be considering it, but I love the pictures. I'll at least show them to the 4 yo. Given the leg room issues, I think I'd put him behind the driver (it's where he is right now anyway). I'll have to measure his ear height to see if it's worthwhile.

  12. #50
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Also, properly restrained adults in the front seats do not have a great risk of dying in frontal crashes. Airbags combined with properly worn seatbelts are very effective in all modern cars, especially in reducing head and torso injuries which are the critical ones. Injuries are not uncommon to the legs, nor are abrasions to the face, or a broken arm from the steering wheel, etc. Fatal injuries are not all that common to properly restrained adults in typical frontal crashes at lower speeds, fortunately.

    Side impacts are the biggest risk to properly restrained passengers, both up front and in back. For an experienced driver, I'm a lot more concerned with the IIHS and NHTSA side impact test results, personally, though I do look at all the crash tests.

    With rear-facing kids properly restrained in back, the risk from a side impact is pretty low, even in a car that didn't do so well in a side impact crash test. Fortunately for older kids in back of a Mazda5, the IIHS side impact test showed a Good result for rear passenger head protection at least. It's the driver that had the worst results for side impacts:-(

    I also wonder why the NHTSA still hasn't tested this family vehicle? Or hasn't released the results if they have.

  13. #51
    Carseat Crazy nataliem257's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPSDarren View Post
    Also, properly restrained adults in the front seats do not have a great risk of dying in frontal crashes. Airbags combined with properly worn seatbelts are very effective in all modern cars, especially in reducing head and torso injuries which are the critical ones. Injuries are not uncommon to the legs, nor are abrasions to the face, or a broken arm from the steering wheel, etc. Fatal injuries are not all that common to properly restrained adults in typical frontal crashes at lower speeds, fortunately.

    Side impacts are the biggest risk to properly restrained passengers, both up front and in back. For an experienced driver, I'm a lot more concerned with the IIHS and NHTSA side impact test results, personally, though I do look at all the crash tests.

    With rear-facing kids properly restrained in back, the risk from a side impact is pretty low, even in a car that didn't do so well in a side impact crash test. Fortunately for older kids in back of a Mazda5, the IIHS side impact test showed a Good result for rear passenger head protection at least. It's the driver that had the worst results for side impacts:-(

    I also wonder why the NHTSA still hasn't tested this family vehicle? Or hasn't released the results if they have.
    I was wondering this as well. I don't quite understand how they decide which vehicles get tested, for IIHS or NHTSA. I thought it was volume, but no small overlap on the Taurus?

  14. #52
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    I know sales volume is a factor. I know that manufacturers can also pay for the costs to have testing done sooner than it would otherwise be done normally.

    I'm guessing that a lot of models that were being sold before the small overlap test will never have them done unless the manufacturer wants it done. Otherwise they will likely just wait for the next generation to test. I'm sure there are exceptions for very popular models.

  15. #53
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Quote Originally Posted by CPSDarren View Post
    I know sales volume is a factor. I know that manufacturers can also pay for the costs to have testing done sooner than it would otherwise be done normally.

    I'm guessing that a lot of models that were being sold before the small overlap test will never have them done unless the manufacturer wants it done. Otherwise they will likely just wait for the next generation to test. I'm sure there are exceptions for very popular models.
    I thought this too, but was then really surprised to see that they tested the 2014 Nissan LEAF, one car we are (were...) considering, in this last batch of testing--even though it's an incredibly small sales volume, was just tested in 2011 with the same design, and is due for a major design overhaul for the next model year. And it didn't do well in the small overlap test at all (and had already done well and was unchanged in everything else), so I can't imagine Nissan paid for the testing. Go figure. But helpful, I guess, to have the info!

  16. #54
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Very weird! Have you considered the Focus Electric? Solid crash test scores there and a pretty nice small car, too.

  17. #55
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Quote Originally Posted by CPSDarren View Post
    Very weird! Have you considered the Focus Electric? Solid crash test scores there and a pretty nice small car, too.
    Just saw this--thanks! Yes, I had posted another thread on this a month back or so, but sadly the Focus Electric is a no-go for us because the battery takes up the floor of the cargo area, and we need a giant dog to sit back there. Ah, well. We had already decided to wait and see what the 2015 Prius v model has in store before making a final decision, and the new LEAF IIHS results affirmed that decision. It's delayed until November/December, though, so for now, we wait. (But I'm holding out hope that the lag means Toyota may be addressing the small overlap test issues with that model, since the other 2015 Prius models will be in dealers at the end of the summer...we'll see!) Backup plan is the Subaru Impreza, since we're pretty happy with its performance on all fronts except for mileage, and may just have to let that one go.

  18. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakster View Post

    Just saw this--thanks! Yes, I had posted another thread on this a month back or so, but sadly the Focus Electric is a no-go for us because the battery takes up the floor of the cargo area, and we need a giant dog to sit back there. Ah, well. We had already decided to wait and see what the 2015 Prius v model has in store before making a final decision, and the new LEAF IIHS results affirmed that decision. It's delayed until November/December, though, so for now, we wait. (But I'm holding out hope that the lag means Toyota may be addressing the small overlap test issues with that model, since the other 2015 Prius models will be in dealers at the end of the summer...we'll see!) Backup plan is the Subaru Impreza, since we're pretty happy with its performance on all fronts except for mileage, and may just have to let that one go.
    Our Impreza regularly gets nearly 40 mpg highway and nearly 30 city. Very good fuel efficiency. And the passenger cabin is very roomy. The backseat is nearly as big as my Tribeca. It is super easy to install seats in, too. We love it!

  19. #57
    CPSDarren - Admin SafeDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Oh right! So many threads can't even remember all the advice I've given lol.

    If cost is no object, how about a Highlander Hybrid or C-Max Energi? Or did I recommend those already as well lol.

  20. #58
    Carseat Crazy nataliem257's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPSDarren View Post
    Oh right! So many threads can't even remember all the advice I've given lol.

    If cost is no object, how about a Highlander Hybrid or C-Max Energi? Or did I recommend those already as well lol.
    kinda off the subject, but I'm curious about the Nissan Rogue rest results. How does a vehicle get a G in both IIHS frontal tests and then get a 3 star rating in the NHTSA? I watched the video and it didn't look that bad to me.

  21. #59
    Carseat Crazy DawgDad's Avatar
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    Re: Mazda 5 IIHS crash results

    Quote Originally Posted by nataliem257 View Post
    kinda off the subject, but I'm curious about the Nissan Rogue rest results. How does a vehicle get a G in both IIHS frontal tests and then get a 3 star rating in the NHTSA? I watched the video and it didn't look that bad to me.
    IIHS didn't test full frontal, but just the small and moderate overlap. Perhaps, and this is just speculation, the corner impact into the large tires on the vehicle helped lessen the load that hurt the pelvic region of the occupants in the Rogue in the NHTSA tests. If you notice they had 4 stars in 2013, added more safety features to the car and they went down to 3 stars (2 stars for women drivers).

    I think we are in an age of change with energy and safety standards increasing. It's literally dragging the manufacturers kicking and screaming into the 21st century, but it saddens me that the majority of Americans don't care about most of this...at all. If I am torn between two cars...they both have their advantages and disadvantages, but one scores 5 stars & G's across the board, and the other scores less than that in anything...I am getting the safer vehicle EVERY time. There is no question! And the majority of the safety tests and features are to test the vehicle against OTHER drivers and not just you. The addition of the overlap is showing that importance more than ever. Heck, if there is a car I am leaning to and it scores poorly on safety tests, I immediately discard and look at #2. It's just too important and I know most on this board feel this way, so the proverbial "preach to the choir" moment has occurred. I have learned a LOT from reading these boards, changed me even in a way...mostly to be more outspoken to friends and family about the importance to this fact. Vanity needs to take a backseat to common sense.

  22. #60
    CPS Fanatic SavsMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DawgDad View Post

    IIHS didn't test full frontal, but just the small and moderate overlap. Perhaps, and this is just speculation, the corner impact into the large tires on the vehicle helped lessen the load that hurt the pelvic region of the occupants in the Rogue in the NHTSA tests. If you notice they had 4 stars in 2013, added more safety features to the car and they went down to 3 stars (2 stars for women drivers).

    I think we are in an age of change with energy and safety standards increasing. It's literally dragging the manufacturers kicking and screaming into the 21st century, but it saddens me that the majority of Americans don't care about most of this...at all. If I am torn between two cars...they both have their advantages and disadvantages, but one scores 5 stars & G's across the board, and the other scores less than that in anything...I am getting the safer vehicle EVERY time. There is no question! And the majority of the safety tests and features are to test the vehicle against OTHER drivers and not just you. The addition of the overlap is showing that importance more than ever. Heck, if there is a car I am leaning to and it scores poorly on safety tests, I immediately discard and look at #2. It's just too important and I know most on this board feel this way, so the proverbial "preach to the choir" moment has occurred. I have learned a LOT from reading these boards, changed me even in a way...mostly to be more outspoken to friends and family about the importance to this fact. Vanity needs to take a backseat to common sense.
    Manufacturers are not kicking and screaming. A manufacturer knows they need to put safe vehicles on the road, not only for the safety of their customers but to stay in business.
    What the manufacturers may be kicking and screaming about is the different tests that are being done at varying times - the target keeps getting moved and it's difficult to keep up. A manufacturer can put out a new model that they spent years and a load of $$$$ developing, that passes all the tests on the market - then shortly after its release a new crash simulation is developed and it doesn't do well. Their name is drug through the media and they have to go back to the drawing bored to improve their scores. All while staying competitive price wise (which is a whole different thread all together) - it's a huge task, an enormous task, one that manufacturers don't take lightly but also one where the playing field isn't always level for them.

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